A Review of Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Development in Africa: Reviving Interconnections for Sustainable Development

Rebecca Yvonne Bayeck, Tutaleni I Asino, Mark Malisa

Abstract


Interest in Indigenous knowledge is increasingly growing. Researchers from diverse field such as education, science, and agriculture are investigating forms of knowledge that are often local and also owned by indigenous communities.  Concerns about the survival of indigenous knowledge has caused some scholars to think about ways to preserve this knowledge since it is generally orally communicated, and often depends on the survival of the indigenous communities that owns it.  Integrated curriculum, incorporation of indigenous knowledge into formal education, and teaching of indigenous languages are some approaches advised by scholars to preserved these ways of knowing. These concerns and suggestions shed light to the fact that indigenous knowledge is part of human history and development, and losing that knowledge would mean losing part of what makes us humans, our ability to understand and face challenges from different perspectives, and creatively.


Keywords


Indigenous knowledge, indigenous communities, integrated curriculum, preservation

References


Chiwome, Emmanuel, Munashe Furusa, and Zifikile Mguni, eds. 2000. Indigenous Knowledge and Technology in African and Diasporan Communities: Multi-Disciplinary Approaches. Harare, Zimbabwe: Southern African Association for Culture and Development Studies in association with Mond Books.

Mawere, Munyaradzi. 2014. Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Development in Africa: Reviving Interconnections for Sustainable Development. Bamenda, Cameroon: Langaa Rpcig.


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